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mainstream fashion

Pak govt allows export of textile masks, hand sanitisers

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Pakistan’s National Command and Operation Centre (NCOC) recently allowed export of hand sanitisers and textile masks, according to adviser to the prime minister on commerce and investment Abdul Razak Dawood, who twitted that the export will not apply to surgical and N95 masks.“Pleased to announce the approval of the export of textile masks. Attached is a copy of the clarification sent by the Ministry of Health to the FBR. Please note that this DOESN’T apply to surgical and N95 masks”, Dawood said in a tweet.On January 31, a ban was imposed on the export of face masks and hand gloves as ‘a first precautionary measure’ and to ensure availability of ‘sufficient basic first aid material’ due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
Fibre2Fashion News Desk (DS)

Pakistan’s National Command and Operation Centre (NCOC) recently allowed export of hand sanitisers and textile masks, according to adviser to the prime minister on commerce and investment Abdul Razak Dawood, who twitted that the export will not apply to surgical and N95 masks. On January 31, a ban was imposed on the export of face masks and hand gloves.

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FASHION

Altuzarra and Etsy partner for limited-edition home decor collection

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Fashion designer Joseph Altuzarra has partnered with craft marketplace Etsy for a limited-edition collection of home decor items.  EtsyThe Altuzarra x Etsy collection features a variety of home goods designed and crafted in partnership between Altuzarra, whose designs have been worn be celebrities from Rihanna to Nicole Kidman, and eight Etsy sellers from around the globe.Items from the collection include candlestick holders made with French ceramics artist Madelon Galland; woven cotton-and-leather coasters and placements created with New Jersey-based fiber artist Damaris Kovach; pet beds made with Brooklyn-based pet shop Laylo; crocheted lace and leather stones made by lacemaker Monica Johnson; clay vases made with designer Sara Paloma; and woven baskets made with Israeli basketmaker Nuni Yavnai.Several items from the collection feature a sustainable twist, including throw pillows made with British Colombia-based seller Marika Rowe and notebooks made with designer Stephanie Lunn, both crafted from leftover fabric from the Altuzarra spring/summer 2016 fashion show.Altuzarra, himself an Etsy shopper, acknowledged that the collaboration is a testament to his passion for considered interior design.  “When I design a collection, I like to imagine the interior space of the person I’m designing for,” said the designer, who founded his eponymous womenswear brand in 2008.“It’s almost like a movie set; it’s all part of the narrative.” “With the uncertainty we live with daily, being surrounded by objects and furnishings that give you a sense of comfort is so important,” he continued.”I wanted to create a collection that would bring people peace, joy, and happiness.”Available now through Etsy.com, prices from the collection range from $12 to $1,400 for the one-of-a-kind, artisan-made home goods. 

Copyright © 2020 FashionNetwork.com All rights reserved.

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Hoodies

2020 USA Baseball Rack Set

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For the third year, USA Baseball’s Rack Set is back.  USA Baseball Shop is bringing back the exclusive rack set for 2020 and each set has THREE autographs.  The 2020 USA Baseball Rack Set includes 70 base cards featuring the players on the 2019 USA Baseball Collegiate, 18U and 15U National Teams.  Each rack set also includes 3 autograph cards numbered to 150 from the 2019 national teams.
Each Rack Set includes the earliest baseball cards from over 30 of MLB.com’s top 100 projected 2020 Draft Picks.
2019 Collegiate National Team: 27 player cards + 1 team checklist = 28 total cards
2019 18U National Team: 20 player cards + 1 team checklist = 21 total cards
2019 15U National Team: 20 player cards + 1 team checklist = 21 total cards
USA Baseball reserves the right to limit order quantities at it’s sole discretion.
*Three autographs on average across the entire production run. USA Baseball does not guarantee the number of autographs in any one Rack Set.

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fashion news

Alibaba’s Tmall Unveils Outlet Business Luxury Soho – WWD

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LONDON – Tmall, China’s largest business-to-consumer ecommerce platform is getting into the outlet business. Designed to help brands accelerate their digital transformation–and pressingly in this coronavirus-hit world–to liquidate stock and bring in a new source of revenue, Luxury Soho was unveiled quietly on April 20.
Named after the SoHo district in New York, known for its bustling fashion energy, the platform is a counterpart to Luxury Pavilion, which was introduced in 2017 and now hosts a wide spectrum of luxury brands and retailers including Cartier, Prada, Zegna, Coach and Net-a-Porter.
With a severe industry-wide sales disruption and consumers’ discretionary spend forecast to be cut back, discount retailers are expected to benefit in the post COVID-19 world. Brick-and-mortar outlet operator Value Retail reported a quick bounce back in its China revenue to pre-virus levels, while the Hong Kong-headquartered outlet operator On The List opened a permanent showroom in Shanghai this month.

That being said, Yoox China closed down on February 28 this year as YNAP focused its efforts on its full-priced business joint venture with Alibaba, while the Outnet, another off-price platform under YNAP, left the market even earlier in 2015.
“Luxury brands have a specific product life cycle. As the main platform for brands’ digital operation in China, Tmall provides solutions for different scenarios,” said Weixiong Hu, vice president of Alibaba Group and general manager of Tmall’s apparel fashion business unit. “In the future, luxury brands can open two different types of stores on Tmall. The official flagship stores that focus on the new products of the season are stationed in Luxury Pavilion and the official outlet stores that focus on discounted products can be put under Luxury Soho.”

Luxury Soho will feature quality products with competitive price points while protecting brands’ premium images at their Luxury Pavilion stores.
Millions of Taobao users who are deemed qualified by Alibaba’s big data algorithm will see the channel show up on the app landing page. For those who don’t see it, they can find the page by searching “luxury discount.”
Tmall said it hopes this channel can be a gathering place for the fashion-loving but price-sensitive Millennials and Gen Z shoppers. There will be short-form videos, live streams, and product recommendation content from key opinion customers. Top tier brands, media and influencers will also be able to share fashion information.
Coach is one of the first brands to join this channel, and the discount goes as deep as 70 percent off. For example, a men’s backpack is marked down from 5,600 renminbi to 1,680 renminbi, or $790 to $237.
Yann Bozec, president and chief executive officer of Coach China, said: “This strategic cooperation with Tmall will help us to connect deeply with Chinese consumers and show them the unique brand image, products and experience of Coach.”
Other brands that have joined the outlet channel include Emporio Armani, Versace, Hugo Boss, Giuseppe Zanotti, MCM, La Perla, Calvin Klein, Diesel, Y-3, UGG and Chiara Ferragni.
Related:
Value Retail’s Scott Malkin Draws Lessons From China >>

Net-a-porter to Open Flagship on Alibaba’s Tmall Luxury Pavilion
Miu Miu Bolsters China Digital Presence With Virtual Idol, Tmall Shop

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urban fashion

Fila Vintage Kane Funnel Neck Zipped Track Top

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How do I make a purchase? What method of payment can I use?Visa, Visa Debit, MasterCard and PayPal Express UK: 020 7385 9934 International: 44+(0)20 7385 9934Is my payment secure?Urban Male Clothing takes your online security very seriously so our site uses SSL certificate providing up to 256 bit encryption which offers the highest level of encryption and security possible. This means you can be rest assured that communications between your browser and this site’s web servers are private and secure. All orders are processed through our secure checkout system provided by Sage Pay. All of our customers private and personal information is kept strictly confidential.Can I have my order delivered to a different address to my billing address?Yes! If you live within  the United Kingdom we are happy to deliver to a different shipping from billing address. we can only ship orders taken over the phone to your billing address but you must have an existing account with us. For security reasons we can only ship International orders to your billing address.What if I have problems paying with my credit card?Try paying with PayPal you do not need an account 

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mainstream fashion

Vietnam’s garment exports fall 9.07% YoY in Q1 2020

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Vietnam’s garment exports fell by 9.07 per cent year on year (YoY) in the first quarter (Q1) of this year and imports by 16.59 per cent. US and European buyers have suspended or cancelled orders since mid-March, according to the Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (Vinatex), whose first quarter revenue dropped by 7 per cent year on year.Retail outlets in the United States and Europe are unlikely to reopen until early May at best, causing extended delays to existing orders while few new orders have been placed, Vinatex’s managing director Cao Huu Hieu was quoted as saying by a Vietnamese media report.Most orders put on hold are for spring and summer clothing lines, while the pandemic is expected to be brought under control by Autumn at the earliest, making it highly likely these lines will be cancelled anyway, he added.The Vietnam Textile and Apparel Association (VITAS) has forecast that the country’s textile and garment exports may shrink by 15 per cent to $33 billion this year. Globally, orders are predicted to fall 29 per cent over the course of the year.
Fibre2Fashion News Desk (DS)

Vietnam’s garment exports fell by 9.07 per cent year on year (YoY) in the first quarter (Q1) of this year and imports by 16.59 per cent. US and European buyers have suspended or cancelled orders since mid-March, according to the Vietnam National Textile and Garment Group (Vinatex), whose first quarter revenue dropped by 7 per cent year on year.

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L’Oréal USA CEO Stéphane Rinderknech on Growing U.S. Beauty Sales – WWD

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Stéphane Rinderknech is a man of many metaphors, and the jigsaw puzzle is one of his favorites. For him, the act of reconstructing a thousand little pieces into a single cohesive image represents the complexity of running — and building — a business.
“You may have 4,000 pieces, but the first step is always to put two pieces together, then three, then four,” says Rinderknech, president and chief executive officer of L’Oréal USA.
“It takes time. And each move, each piece, is important. Because you don’t get to 4,000 if you don’t get the third one. And it’s the same with everything we do in the company.
“When you first come to the U.S., you’re lost,” he continues. “Day after day, hour after hour, the image becomes clearer. Step by step, every meeting, every discussion, every trip, every moment is an opportunity to put two other pieces of the puzzle together that is L’Oréal USA.”

Rinderknech assumed his role officially on Jan. 1, 2020, but has been in the U.S. since September, traveling across the country and assembling his vision for the future. A lot depends on Rinderknech being able to fit together the many disparate elements of the North American beauty scene — not least of all which is to help restore L’Oréal to significant growth in a market that had stagnated even before the coronavirus crisis.

If anyone seems up for the challenge, it is Rinderknech. Ask those who know him best to describe him, and the first word they use is “energy,” a force that comes through in even the most casual conversation. Rinderknech speaks with kinetic animation.
His sentences come out in bursts of adjectives, idea building upon idea, verbally italicizing key words and all punctuated with hand gestures for emphasis. His voice rises with excitement as he shares a concept, idea or anecdote, and when he listens, he leans in, intently focused on whoever is speaking.
For Rinderknech, people are a key part of the “pieces” that enable him to connect the dots and see the full picture, and he relishes human interaction. “I want every discussion I have, every meeting, to never be indifferent,” he says. “Something has to happen there. We have to build another step in the relationship.”
When the coronavirus pandemic hit the U.S. in early March, the puzzle became exponentially more complicated, but the picture immediately took shape. Although he may not yet know the country intimately, his mandate was clear and his call to action immediate.
“Going through a crisis makes us stronger together,” says Rinderknech, of the company’s 11,000-strong workforce. “Sharing this experience makes us so much closer. I see everyone’s homes, their dogs, their kids. This would never happen in a normal context.
“There is a spirit here,” he continues, “and to lift it up, to continue to move forward to be resistant, to protect the business and give our people a sense of direction, that is a very important mission.”
As the COVID-19 crisis worsened in the U.S., Rinderknech had three key priorities. First, to assure the health and well-being of L’Oréal’s workforce; second, to galvanize the company to contribute to the greater good, via the production of hand sanitizers, small business and vendor relief and donations ranging from financial grants to needed goods such as gloves, and third, how not only to mitigate the impact on the business — but how to learn from it, build on it and transform the way L’Oréal operates.

Stéphane Rinderknech 
Mark Mann/WWD

Even though the coronavirus pandemic had not yet broken out when L’Oréal chairman and ceo Jean-Paul Agon appointed Rinderknech as ceo of the U.S., it was clear he was brought on board to be an agent of change. According to L’Oréal’s own figures, the firm has a 13 percent share of the North American beauty market, making it the largest pure-play company here. North America accounted for 25.3 percent of L’Oréal’s overall business in 2019, or about 7.6 billion euros.
But as big as those numbers are, the region has also slowed down considerably. In July, Agon characterized the market as “flat at best.” In contrast, China, the market Rinderknech was most recently ceo of, posted growth of 30 percent last year, led by e-commerce, which is the top-ranked channel in the country and accounts for upward of 40 percent of sales.
“Stéphane is one of the most energetic men I have ever met, and he always keeps pushing in order to achieve his goals,” says Agon.
“At the same time, he is able to lead a team and effectively communicate his energy and ambition. Choosing him to lead the U.S. was not based only on what he has already done in a highly competitive market,” Agon continues, “but more on his skills and strength, which are extremely appropriate to the U.S. market.”
Agon knows whereof he speaks: He became ceo of L’Oréal USA literally days before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks in 2001, and took over the global ceo role in 2006, just prior to the global economic crash of 2008.
L’Oréal recovered from both events to emerge stronger than ever — and Rinderknech fully expects to do the same when the pandemic has ended. As focused as he is on marshaling L’Oréal’s resources to conquer the coronavirus, he also recognizes the opportunity a changed landscape presents, particularly one in which technology has assumed a larger importance than ever before for a population largely confined to their homes.
“There is going to be an acceleration of the digital transformation, an acceleration within the acceleration,” says Rinderknech. “What we are going to learn is to adjust the content, build the capability, bring the consumer experience.”
For now, that means adjusting and adapting to the needs of quarantined consumers, creating livestreamed content, for example. In the future, who knows? But the point is to build in the agility needed to respond in real time.
“We have to adapt to the consumer reality, to be in their life, to be with them,” says Rinderknech. “The role of a brand is to seed connection, to engage in a dialogue with consumers. It is not to say, ‘Buy my thing and here is a great price.’ It’s, ‘I am here with you and for you, sharing the experienceand the moments.’
“What I’m interested in is the backbone of a brand, not whether it’s big or small,” he continues. “Who are your consumers? What does beauty mean to them? What do they aspire to? And what is our platform of expression to connect with those audiences that we have clearly identified, which is different depending on if you are CeraVe or Giorgio Armani or La Roche-Posay or YSL or L’Oréal Paris.”
He refutes the notion that the U.S. can’t be a high-growth market like China, positing that if you give the people what they want, when they want it, where they want and how, sales will follow, as evidenced by the success of products like L’Oréal Paris Revitalift Derm Intensives Hyaluronic Acid and Glycolic Acid serums and Maybelline New York Falsies LashLift Mascara (“a salon gesture adapted to mass.”)
“The market is not growing that quickly, for sure,” says Rinderknech. “But I think anybody in this market can grow very, very fast. There are different forces, different changes, different habits, and we have a responsibility to find the dynamism in the market by putting the right innovations, right quality, service, experience and products that can perfectly fulfill the demands and desires of consumers, which are changing.”
The curiosity to find answers to those questions is what drives him most. Whether it is consumer mores or languages (he speaks French, English, Spanish, German, Mandarin and Japanese) or cello concertos (Rinderknech is an avid player and says music is like beauty in that “there are a million versions of the same suite and every time you play one, it is never the same”), Rinderknech loves to learn.
“I am driven to discover, to take risks, to dive into new things, to push into new frontiers,” he says. “Because you discover something and then it leads you to discover more.”
Rinderknech has had a relatively meteoric rise through the ranks of L’Oréal, and in each posting, he has taken a key learning and moved forward. He joined the company in 2001 in Miami, as Lancôme area manager for South America in the travel retail division, where he soon caught the attention of senior management by adeptly managing through the sociopolitical crises in Brazil and Argentina and gaining significant market share advantages by supporting retailers during the upheavals and reaping the benefits when life returned to normal.
Three years later, he moved to Japan, first as head of Biotherm and then was quickly promoted to run Lancôme, a brand he revitalized in that market. In 2008, he was named head of L’Oréal Luxe in South Korea, where he launched Kiehl’s and helped propel it to the number-one skin-care brand in the market. In 2011, he moved to China, first as general manager of the Luxe division, then as head of the Consumer Products Division, and finally, in 2016, he was named ceo of L’Oréal China.
Rinderknech calls Japan the school of “consistency, rigor, quality, depth and detail,” while Korea was all about speed. (“They move so fast—there’s a word for it, pali-pali, you hear it all the time.”)
In China, which he calls the school of scale and speed, Rinderknech helped propel L’Oréal to the number-one spot in the country, and proved himself an able student of digital. “Running CPD there was quite a challenge — there was a brutal shift from offline to e-commerce, with the rise of Alibaba, Jingdong, etc., so we had to maneuver through that.”
By all accounts, he did so very successfully. L’Oréal was the top-ranked beauty company in e-commerce in China in 2018, with a 22 percent share of the prestige market, according to a company presentation. The group’s ranking on Tmall improved considerably under Rinderknech as well. In 2016, for example, Lancôme was the sixth largest brand on the platform and L’Oréal Paris was number nine; by 2018, the brands were first and third respectively.
L’Oréal’s top brass hope he can have the same impact here. “You’ve got the two biggest economies in the world and the two leading countries in terms of digital,” says Nicolas Hieronimus, deputy chief executive officer. “The ability to learn from one another is very important and Stéphane will definitely help our U.S. business benefit from some of the best practices and learnings that he got from a fast accelerating Chinese digital world.”
Already that is happening. Cheryl Vitali, previously the global president of Kiehl’s who was named global president, American luxury brands, in January, is one of the few executives stateside who has worked extensively with Rinderknech prior to his appointment in the U.S. “He is very focused on digital opportunities and commerce,” she says. “He was able to create a competitive advantage for us in China, and he sees similar opportunities here, where we can move quickly and see opportunities related to what the consumer is doing and how she/he continue to shift.”
Rinderknech’s approach is to incorporate digital into all aspects of the business, weeding out silos and making sure the entire organization is using all of the technological tools at its disposal to drive sales across all platforms. The phrase “o plus o,” online plus off-line, comes up frequently in his conversations, emphasis on the plus.
“It is not a confrontation, it is a convergence. This is something I was really exposed to in my previous job,” he says. “When I go to a store, I have my phone with me, and I do a lot of things with it. How does digital complement the in-store experience? It’s not shifting something. It’s making sure that the teams here that work on e-commerce and that work in brick-and-mortar don’t think channel. They need to think consumer.”

Stéphane Rinderknech 
Mark Mann/WWD

Rinderknech himself loves to spend time in stores. On a bright Monday morning just one week before the coronavirus quarantine in New York City, he was recalling excitedly visits to CVS, Target and Ulta that he had made over the weekend. “The only reality of the work we do is in the stores. If you have questions, go to the stores. The best discussions, best ideas, are always in the stores,” he says. “It’s great to go with people, because they can answer your questions, but it’s great to be alone, to understand what is it that I feel when I’m there. And then suddenly, bam! It pops up. And you say, ‘Right!’ And you get your idea.”
As for his “aha” moment that weekend? “I think our new products are amazing, but sometimes not visible enough or educational enough for consumers,” Rinderknech says. “Consumers want to be informed. How do you tell them about the ingredients, the routine? We have a tremendous opportunity to educate them.”
That being said, he is looking to tap into e-commerce’s potential as a force multiplier by taking advantage of the many hero products across L’Oréal’s brand portfolio. “These are products that are already imprinted on the minds of the consumers and the algorithm favors them, because there is organic search and stories behind them,” he says. “If we invest to make them even more visible, then there is great potential of growth ahead.”
Before the COVID-19 pandemic hit, Rinderknech spent a significant amount of his time traveling from state to state, visiting stores, observing consumers and meeting with teams everywhere to disseminate his vision. He makes it a point to see the world beyond the walls of an office, be it going on a 50-mile bike ride from Santa Monica to Malibu and back with Hieronimus (they went to a Lakers game after) or having dinner at an Outback Steakhouse during a market tour in the Midwest.
His leadership style is to make sure everyone is aligned on end goals — and then let the people involved figure out how best to get there. For an organization to thrive, Rinderknech believes people must know what is expected of them, where they fit within the frame, how they can best contribute to reaching the goals and also feel that they are continually learning. “There is not one way to get to Rome — you have to respect that there are different ways so that the diversity can kick in,” he says. “You tell them, let’s get there, but give them the freedom to tell you how. It’s like a recipe. Every person counts, every interaction counts, every ingredient counts. You take what everybody says, you mix it in a blender” — here he stops and makes a zzzzzzttttttt sound — “and then it’s like, ‘OK! That’s the way. I got it.’”
For sure, Rinderknech’s approach represents a newer way of working for many in L’Oréal. “Meetings tend to be much more collaborative and problem-solution-oriented, as opposed to a formal presentation, where you’re presenting numbers, concepts and strategies,” says Megan Grant, president of L’Oréal Luxe USA, who notes Rinderknech often pops into an office unannounced to bat around an idea. “It’s a more collaborative working session, and because of his approachability and energy, teams feel comfortable speaking their mind and giving their opinions.”
It’s a give-and-take rather than top-down approach, a style he honed in Japan. “If I give orders, I’m not going to get speed, I may get resistance,” Rinderknech says. “To gain in speed means actually sometimes to step back and play the game of back-and-forth, until you feel 100 percent ownership and engagement with the teams. That’s when the ideas are going, and everyone is hypercreative.”
While speed may suffer in the short term, in the longer term, Rinderknech believes such an approach accelerates change, likening it to a surfer riding a wave. For him, the wave is the size and scale of the U.S. market. “When you surf, you don’t use your muscle to fight the wave. You identify the right wave, and then let it carry you,” he says. “It is your balance, your agility, your flexibility and your skills that enable you to stay on the wave.”
Post-pandemic, that agility will be more necessary than ever before, as consumers and marketers adjust to whatever the “new normal” will be. “Part of our role now is to challenge people, to help them reinvent a whole new world, because this is what it is going to be about — nothing is going to be the same,” says Rinderknech. “The agility to rebound is to select what you want to build, to be able to allocate the right resources in the right place to ensure the right rebound.”
Ever since he was a five-year-old in Agen, France, where he would memorize the capitals of the world, Rinderknech has yearned to travel, and he is at his most animated when he talks about how much he loves discovering new cultures and meeting new people.
The first thing he wants to do post-quarantine is surround himself again with people. “I hate noisy restaurants, but when we’re able to again, I’m going to go to the most crowded restaurant. I am not such a social distancing fan,” says Rinderknech. “I love to be with people and I hope soon we are going to be together again.”
 
The CEO Chronicles
L’Oréal established Cosmair (short for cosmetics for hair) in the U.S. in 1953, and officially changed its name to L’Oréal USA in 2000. Rinderknech is the company’s eighth ceo. Two previous ones, Sir Lindsay Owen-Jones and Jean-Paul Agon, subsequently became ceo’s of the entire company after their time in the U.S. Here, a timeline.
1953-1981: Jacques Corrèze
1981-1984: Lindsay Owen-Jones
1984-1987: Jean Levy
1987-2001: Guy Peyrelongue
2001-2005: Jean-Paul Agon
2005-2009: Laurent Attal
2009-2020: Frédéric Rozé
2020: Stéphane Rinderknech
 

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FASHION

U.S. retail executives readying for change post-coronavirus: survey

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As the Covid-19 crisis continues to force temporary store closures around the world, a new study from McKinsey & Company has revealed that although consumers might be eager to hit the mall, retail executives expect a delayed rebound of traffic once stores reopen, and will be embracing several operational changes. Retail executives readying for change post Covid-19. – Instagram: @mallofamericaThe survey of 98 U.S.-based executives revealed that most expect a recovery of store traffic to take at least several months, with 36 percent estimating six months or more for traffic to rebound.Once stores do open, precautionary measures and operating-model changes will be widespread. In fact, more than half of respondents indicate they will temporarily reduce operating hours and staffing levels when stores reopen. Those who plan to reduce staffing levels expect to reopen with an average of 22 percent fewer store employees.In store, executives plan to institute precautionary measures such as increasing store cleanings and encouraging safe distancing among customers in stores to promote employee and customer safety. Moreover, responses suggest that apparel and beauty retailers will be making changes to its policies by extending deadlines for returns and changing returns-handling procedures. Longterm, many executives say they are also reevaluating their footprints altogether with approximately one-third of respondents reporting that they are considering not reopening underperforming stores. Similarly, those who had plans to open new stores might be pressing pause and delaying any new store opening dates. With stores closed, the importance of e-commerce has never been more relevant and retailers expect e-commerce to remain stronger than before the Covid-19 outbreak. Surveyed executives predict a 6 to 13 percentage-point increase in online penetration compared with pre-pandemic levels.And so, about three-quarters of apparel executives say they plan to improve online integration at their stores.McKinsey & Company’s findings are based on survey data collected between April 6 and April 8, 2020.

Copyright © 2020 FashionNetwork.com All rights reserved.

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jeans

What Is Fast Fashion, Anyway?

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Each year, the clothing that is simply thrown away amounts to about 11 million tons in the US alone. These garments, full of lead, pesticides, and countless other chemicals, almost never break down and spend their life releasing these toxic chemicals in the air. Fast fashion’s carbon footprint is giving huge industries like air travel and oil a “run for their money.”Along with the effects fast fashion has on our earth, these processes affect the humans who wear them, and the humans who make them. Some garments and accessories even have dangerous amounts of lead in them, and exposure to lead increases one’s risk of infertility, heart attacks, and more. Skin is the largest organ of the body and putting these poorly made items on it is dangerous all on its own. This danger only grows in the factories, towns, and homes which are used to produce these items.A garment worker’s health is constantly being jeopardized through their long hours, lack of resources, exposure to harmful chemicals, and often physical abuse. The people who make fast fashion clothing have been confirmed to be underpaid, underfed, and pushed to their limits because there are often few other options. The Rise of Slow FashionAlthough the fashion industry as a whole is guilty of committing many crimes against people and the environment, it is most evident when it comes to fast fashion. Slow fashion is a movement towards mindful manufacturing, fair labor rights, natural materials, and lasting garments. Conscious fashion means there are brands, communities, and individuals who are fighting for the safety of our earth and fellow humans. Buying a garment from a responsible brand ensures that you have agency over your personal style, are getting a quality product, and are protecting those that need it most.

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mainstream fashion

Esprit integrating booked materials in later orders

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Esprit Holdings Ltd, a manufacturer of clothing, footwear, accessories, and housewares under the Esprit label, is integrating booked materials in later orders, wherever possible. Since the end of March, however, Esprit’s German legal entities are under a special legal status called “proactive shield proceedings”, which is similar to Chapter 11 in the US.In view of COVID-19, many apparel factories primarily in developing countries in Asia have reported cancellation of orders from global brands / retailers. Apparel sector being the finest value adding segment in the entire value chain and one of the largest employment providing sector is under despair because of cancelled production orders.In response to Fibre2Fashion’s email to Esprit asking how the company intends to support its suppliers during the current crisis, an Esprit spokesperson said, “At Esprit, sustainability and social responsibility are part of our DNA and at the core of our strategy. For years, we have developed strong partnerships in our supply chain working with reliable factories. Exceptionally, since the end of March, Esprit’s German legal entities are under a special legal status called “proactive shield proceedings”, which is similar to Chapter 11 in the US. Therefore, certain payments for orders with handover to a forwarder before the end of March are right now on hold in a legal process. The final outcome is expected in July.”The spokesperson said some adjustments and cancellation of orders have been necessary due to the decline in demand caused by the COVID-19 crisis. “Wherever possible, we are integrating booked materials in later orders. We are well aware of the consequences for our supply chain partners and factory workers. Their well-being is important to us, as well as the continuity of our business which sustains many people’s livelihood. We are in close contact with all suppliers to ensure transparency in this process. Our goal is to always find a mutually acceptable solution with our partners.”
Fibre2Fashion News Desk (RKS)

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‘Making the Cut’ Winner Jonny Cota – WWD

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Amazon “Making the Cut” winner Jonny Cota may be the luckiest fashion designer in America, if not the world, right now.
Not only does he have a $1 million prize, he’s got a global platform to launch his brand with one of the few retailers that’s come out ahead during the coronavirus, and arrives with a built-in fan base — all at a time when the future of showing and shopping fashion is very much up in the air.
“How weird we’re all in this global pandemic and every designer is struggling and I would be in that same situation except right now I’m having the opportunity of the lifetime?” said Cota, a 15-year veteran of the Los Angeles fashion scene whose niche Goth leather brand Skingraft has been worn by Rihanna, Justin Bieber and Beyoncé.

Cota took top honors in the streamer’s first fashion competition show, starring Heidi Klum and Tim Gunn, after a runway showdown against Berlin-based Esther Perbandt, who has a similarly dark, but more elevated and conceptual aesthetic. (For finale judges Klum, Naomi Campbell, Joseph Altuzarra, Chiara Ferragni and Nicole Richie, it came down to which designer had the versatility to become the next global brand; for the record, Klum and Campbell voted for Perbandt.)
Since the show wrapped shooting in September, Cota has been mentored by Christine Beauchamp, president of Amazon Fashion, who appears in the last two episodes of the series, during which designers had to prove their commercial chops by creating their own pop-up shops and presenting her with a business plan.

With guidance from her team on creating assets for the Amazon customer, including clean photography, clear size charts and product bullet points, Cota created the 20-look Jonny Cota Studio collection now available on the U.S. site, and rolling out internationally soon, with prices from $40 to $350. (Perbandt’s brand has been picked up by Amazon’s sister site, Shopbop.com.)
Cota’s clothes are certainly cooler than anything you’d expect to see while shopping for Tide pods and toilet paper. Mostly genderless and in a black-and-white palette, they include a blanket poncho reminiscent of his past work, motocross-inspired denim, and a butterfly-print caftan. Like Christian Siriano, another designer born of TV, Cota is quick with a quip and he has a story to tell, which should serve him well (as should his preshow celebrity following). But there are plenty of winners of fashion competition shows, including of “Making the Cut’s” older sibling “Project Runway,” who have not become global brands. However, they were not backed by Amazon.

Jonny Cota Studio 
Courtesy

The retail behemoth has been slow to the prestige fashion world, even though it sponsored the 2012 Met Gala, and Anna Wintour is friendly with Jeff Bezos, whom she cozied up to at the Tom Ford runway show in L.A. in February.
In a deep dive into Amazon Fashion’s apparel offerings, a January report from Coresight and DataWeave found the bulk of what’s listed are non-branded, or “generic” products, and activewear is the top-selling category. But the online giant’s fashion currency has risen dramatically since the pandemic has left much of the rest of the retail landscape in shambles, with Sears, J.C. Penney, Neiman Marcus and other major chains struggling and some nearing bankruptcy. (By contrast, shares of Amazon are at a record high.)

“What will limit Amazon’s potential is the fact it’s becoming clear to brands that it is a predatory partner,” cautions retail futurist Doug Stephens. “The next thing you know, they are private-labeling what you just did, and using your data to do it, and selling to the customers you just acquired.”
Still, sources say Amazon is preparing to expand its prestige fashion footprint further, has been working with the Council of Fashion Designers of America to help designers sell excess inventory, and could even step in with a new framework for a future New York Fashion Week. WWD broke the news in January that Amazon is readying its own digital storefront for luxury fashion, which could also open up a host of opportunities for content and commerce. Beauchamp would not comment on future initiatives.

A look from Esther Perbandt’s finale collection for “Making the Cut.” 
Janice Yim/Amazon Studios

What those initiatives look like could depend in part on the success of “Making the Cut” and sales of Cota’s collection (the designer won two challenges during the series, and both looks sold out, though it’s not clear how many were produced).
Amazon declined to share viewership numbers, or how much it has invested in launching Cota’s brand versus what he will get to invest in himself from the $1 million pot. But the marriage of content and commerce is a step forward for the platform, which has gradually been improving on its early QVC-like shopping segments with more slickly produced fashion entertainment programming and brand-building around personalities. In July 2019, Amazon exclusively launched Lady Gaga’s Haus Laboratories beauty line with Amazon Live previews and tutorials, and in September, it produced Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty runway show, bringing her lingerie collection to Prime Video members to watch and shop.
Amazon has not revealed plans for a second season of “Making the Cut,” but is still casting as if it will have one.
“I dreamt about what it could look like before the pandemic and I dream about what it could look like in the pandemic and after the pandemic,” said Klum of the show’s prospects, adding that the challenges could explore remote designing, for example.
“The more constraints we have, the more creative we become. There are few things less inspiring than a blank canvas,” said Gunn, along with a pitch for the resiliency of fashion: “We all need clothes.”
COVID-19 has put Amazon in the spotlight more than ever before — for better and for worse, as the retail giant, like its essential retail peers, has had difficulty keeping up with consumer demand and also has faced pushback from workers who have walked out demanding better safety protections in the warehouses where they continue to ship essential and not-so-essential merchandise to the quarantined millions.
“Amazon in one way or another has become a hero to a lot of people who are depending on essential goods to be delivered to them,” said Cota, who got a call from the show’s casting director the same day in March 2019 that he closed his Skingraft store in downtown L.A. after the landlord doubled the rent. “I wouldn’t have jumped at the opportunity if it had happened a year, two years, or five years before. It was this moment where I had no idea what tomorrow looked like, no idea where the brand was going. There was no better time to say ‘yes’ to this opportunity.”
A California native, Cota started out making costumes for a San Francisco vaudeville circus troupe (he himself was a stilt walker) before launching his fashion business in 2005 with a collection of leather jackets made from vintage remnants (hence the name, Skingraft). Earning a following for motocross jackets, drop-crotch pants and leather holster bags, he showed his collections, which have a high-end price point from $100 to more than $1,000, at both L.A. and New York fashion weeks. A retail pioneer, in 2009, he became one of the first to sell high-end clothing in downtown L.A. at the first of two storefronts he had before moving to his current space at Row DTLA. He also had a store in New York’s NoLIta in 2013.
“I had a friend who cast ‘Project Runway’ for years, and I always said, nope, not for me,” said Cota, 37. “Specifically, a lot of other shows are heavily reliant on sewing. Even though we had to sew a lot on ‘Making the Cut,’ the fact it was a show about entrepreneurship and being a creative director, that spoke to me and my skill set.”
Like many fashion brands, his has gone through several lives — initially wholesaling to speciality stores such as H. Lorenzo and Opening Ceremony; then taking on investment from venture capital group Innov8 (the partnership ended in 2016); then shifting to a direct-to-consumer model with see-now-buy-now collections of more accessible items, such as hoodies and T-shirts. When he got the casting call, he was at an inflection point.
“I went [on the show] to get exposure for Skingraft, I went in there to help discover the next chapter of our company,” said Cota. “We were switching to an online model as a brand and we needed to reach a global audience. So I thought, get me through three, maybe four episodes. That will be enough exposure to give us a new opportunity.”

Skingraft’s fall 2016 collection. 
WWD

Cota earned points on the show for his willingness to listen to judges’ critiques, to soften his aesthetic, incorporate color and print and more accessible shapes, including feminine dresses. He even agreed to change the name of his brand to Jonny Cota. To underscore his journey, he titled his final collection “Metamorphosis.”
“I’m so proud of what I’ve accomplished with Skingraft, but even when I have spoken on social media, it has a tone, the tone is cool and unapproachable. That worked for what it was, but it was definitely an armor to hide behind. When first going on ‘Making the Cut,’ I started giving them Skingraft silhouette after Skingraft silhouette. And the judges could see right through it, that there was more there. Naomi Campbell dragging me through the coals after the couture challenge, and being like, this is derivative, this is boring, show me more. I thought it was the worst day and it turned out to be the best day. I had to do a lot of soul-searching, let go of a part of myself and my aesthetic.”
Funnily enough, since the show started airing in March, Skingraft has seen a halo effect, to the tune of a 500 percent increase in sales from March to April: “Since the judges critiqued the name Skingraft, it’s made our fans come out in full force and it’s our best month in sales of our career.” While Cota initially planned on folding the Skingraft collection into the new Jonny Cota Studio collection, now he plans to keep them both going — and available, as soon as retail reopens, at his L.A. store.
“Niche followings are so unique. Skingraft customers, they really cherish the all-black Goth-y side of Skingraft and they don’t want to let that go. At the same time, you can tell they are so proud of me and of themselves feeling like they were onto something before the rest of the world. We get a lot of messages like, ‘I’ve been going to your store for 10 years in DTLA and finally the world gets to see what I saw.’”
Since the show wrapped, Cota has spent most of his time in Bali overseeing production of the collection (he’s long produced his clothing there). “Skingraft will always be the little Goth-y stepchild doing its thing, but the focus for the rest of the year will be on Jonny Cota and the Jonny Cota for Amazon collection.” (Whether his relationship with Amazon lasts beyond that is uncertain.)
Even with the gloom and doom the pandemic has wrought on the fashion industry, Cota said he never really considered taking the $1 million and cashing out (and chances are, Amazon would have nixed that idea). “I know it will be a well-funded year and I’m going into this without caution and full steam ahead. I’m excited to invest the majority of the prize into the company. But also, Jonny Cota has been underpaid for the last three years. He always pays his team first. It’s time to have an adult salary for a change.”
Someway, somehow, he’s feeling good about the next chapter. “The show launched from this moment of entertaining people at home while they are trying to stay safe…and we’re launching a brand that has never been more accessibly priced for me. The timing is perfect — let us entertain you, let us make you feel optimistic, offer you a piece of us at the most reasonable price we can, let’s get through this together and move forward together.”

Jonny Cota Studio 
Courtesy

Jonny Cota Studio 
Courtesy

Jonny Cota Studio 
Courtesy

 

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